COP15 and the importance of the creative industry Minimize

With the UN Climate Change Conference COP15 approaching in the beginning of December and the world focusing on future sustainability and the critical situation of our planet, it is interesting to reflect upon actions and prospects within the creative industry as a consequence of this hot topic.

Traditionally artists have always been considered as new thinkers and even sometimes a bit odd in their view of their surroundings and life itself. Often they have been ahead of their time and their views of current issues. It looks like that hasn’t changed much prior to COP15 in Copenhagen this coming month which many consider crucial to the future of the world.

Throughout Europe artists have been campaigning for months and exhibitions focusing on the very subject of climate change and human impact on the environment are appearing all over. One of these exhibitions was at Trafalgar Square, where ten giant tree stumps from Ghana were on show. This “Ghost Forest”, by Angela Palmer is an incredible, once-in-a lifetime cityscape installation with the purpose of being an eye-opener for people and making us realize that with continuing tree cutting we are losing the battle against climate change. The exhibition will be travelling from London to Copenhagen to provide an arresting symbol for the UN conference on climate change from December 7 to 18.

This exhibition is only one of several in which the creative industry contributes to help visualize the global situation we are facing and make us understand the importance of an agreement in Copenhagen. Apart from these exhibitions all over, the creative industry can be looked at as an industry of the future – an industry which in the future will generate environmentally friendly and sustainable jobs around the world.

Cultural sustainability implies a development process that maintains all types of cultural assets, from minority languages and traditional rituals to artworks, artifacts and heritage buildings and sites. It is the creative industries that provide the services and the investments necessary for cultural sustainable development paths to be followed. Furthermore, creative industries are environmentally friendly. Since the primary input for creative activities is creativity rather than natural resources as in the case of mining or land in the case of agriculture and the production of creative products is usually less dependent on heavy industrial infrastructure, policies for enhancing creative capacities are in principle compatible with objectives of environmental protection. If we have to change the way we live as gradually as some scientists fear, the creative industry can be a potential power factor of future industries.
 

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