3. The “Creative Growth” project fits the European Agenda

The European year of Creativity and Innovation 2009 is taking place at a time of economic crisis in Europe. One needs real creativity and innovation at times like this – and regions need to develop policy tools, support structures and conditions that encourage new ideas to happen and to be open to change. Nurturing creativity is key to promote a region’s competitiveness.

The Interreg IVC “Creative Growth” project is timely as it aims to develop the creative sector as a new business sector and a key driver of the emerging knowledge economy. Regions need to foster local/regional creativity and the Creative Growth project will deliver evidence-based knowledge and best practices to;

  • Enable regional policy authorities to make informed decisions to stimulate creativity;
  • Improve means to support creative entrepreneurs;
  • Catalyze creativity by creating a network of creative regions.

The culture and creative sector is a growing sector, developing at a higher pace that the rest of the economy. The same implies for to employment. At a recent conference the Education and Culture Commissioner Ján Figel said that “Europe’s future success lies in boosting its citizens’ creativity and innovation, and building a long-term “knowledge economy”, rather than focusing on short-term technical and economic solutions”.

It is assumed that more than half of the jobs in manufacturing have been lost in Europe since the late 1990’s. Europe is a leader in sectors such as music, fashion, design, architecture, the arts market and games development. The culture and creative industries therefore offer enormous potential for the EU to remain among the top players with regards to global competitiveness.

The “Creative Growth” project is dedicated to develop and share evidence-based results in stimulating regional growth through the development of the creative sector and thereby supporting Europe in transforming to the “knowledge economy”.

Sources: KEA, October 2006; “The Economy of Culture”; KEA newsletter March 2008; Creativity; driving local economic development and EPC policy debate February 16, 2009 “Boosting Europe’s knowledge Economy”.

 

 

3. The “Creative Growth” project fits the European Agenda

The European year of Creativity and Innovation 2009 is taking place at a time of economic crisis in Europe. One needs real creativity and innovation at times like this – and regions need to develop policy tools, support structures and conditions that encourage new ideas to happen and to be open to change. Nurturing creativity is key to promote a region’s competitiveness.

The Interreg IVC “Creative Growth” project is timely as it aims to develop the creative sector as a new business sector and a key driver of the emerging knowledge economy. Regions need to foster local/regional creativity and the Creative Growth project will deliver evidence-based knowledge and best practices to;

  • Enable regional policy authorities to make informed decisions to stimulate creativity;
  • Improve means to support creative entrepreneurs;
  • Catalyze creativity by creating a network of creative regions.

The culture and creative sector is a growing sector, developing at a higher pace that the rest of the economy. The same implies for to employment. At a recent conference the Education and Culture Commissioner Ján Figel said that “Europe’s future success lies in boosting its citizens’ creativity and innovation, and building a long-term “knowledge economy”, rather than focusing on short-term technical and economic solutions”.

It is assumed that more than half of the jobs in manufacturing have been lost in Europe since the late 1990’s. Europe is a leader in sectors such as music, fashion, design, architecture, the arts market and games development. The culture and creative industries therefore offer enormous potential for the EU to remain among the top players with regards to global competitiveness.

The “Creative Growth” project is dedicated to develop and share evidence-based results in stimulating regional growth through the development of the creative sector and thereby supporting Europe in transforming to the “knowledge economy”.

Sources: KEA, October 2006; “The Economy of Culture”; KEA newsletter March 2008; Creativity; driving local economic development and EPC policy debate February 16, 2009 “Boosting Europe’s knowledge Economy”.

 

 

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The Creative Growth newsletter is distributed twice a year during the project period.

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The Creative Growth newsletter is distributed twice a year during the project period.

Please sign up here to recieve a notification when the next issue is released.

(Should you wish to unsubscribe, please click here)

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